Sunday, October 9, 2016

Playing Catch-Up

I took a huge step in my career this past week by releasing an indie-pubbed book. (Excuse me while I pat myself on the back.) To say I learned a lot from the experience would be an understatement. But now it's catch-up time, and I'm working in reverse of my usual routine.

My reasons for going indie with this book are many.

First, the original version got rejected by the small press I'd been with for years, but gave me some good advice on how to revise it. Unfortunately, their window for accepting holiday stories closed before I could incorporate the changes. So it was either publish it myself or have it sit around for a year.

Second, it was a novella, and editors charge by the word, so this was a good fit for me.

Third, I already knew a ton of editors who I've worked with over the years, and knew which ones accepted freelance work. The same held true for cover artists and formatters. I didn't need to beat the bushes. My past experience put me in a good position to be able to make the switch.

Fourth, since 90% of all e-book sales are with Amazon, I decided to make mine exclusive to them, and not get involved in a print book. I don't think novellas work that well in print, and if I went exclusively with Amazon, I'd save myself a lot of hassle.

As I began the journey, I decided not to publicize it until I actually had the book up on Amazon as a viable product. But I did it–got it up on Amazon all by myself. The first reviews are in and guess what? I can write a believable Regency book! Now, I have to find some well-known review sites to look at it, and this is where it gets tricky, since most want to have an ARC and six weeks' notice. Even though I am telling everyone it doesn't matter when the review goes up as long as it does, I'm facing a new challenge. And then there's publicity and marketing. Playing catch-up.

Will I go the indie route in the future? Hard to say. I still enjoy working with a publisher, some more than others. I want to catapult into the big leagues, so maybe writing a Regency series is the way to go, and writing this little novella has launched my career down a different path. But at least now I know indie publishing is not the huge behemoth I once thought it was, and I can do it, if I so choose.

Here's an excerpt from my latest, A Regency Yuletide


 “Whatever shall we do with the rest of the day?” Jeremy quirked his brow in her direction.
“I’m going to talk Emma into coming with me to the Female Visiting Society meeting this afternoon. If I can pry her away from Thomas, that is.” Sophie chuckled. “They do appear to be joined at the hip, don’t they?”
“Are there ever any men at these meetings? Or are they all women?” Jeremy shifted his load of greenery.
Sophie glanced over. “Would you care to come with me? I’ll admit, I did extend an invitation to you yesterday, but I didn’t expect to be taken seriously.”
He shrugged. “I have no wish to be the only male in the room, but I am interested in what you do.”
“You are?” Sophie’s voice rose an octave. “Why?”
He shook his head. “You really have no idea how interesting I find all this, how interesting I find you?”
“Now you’re making fun of me, sir.” Sophie removed her hand from his arm and hurried ahead of him.
“Sophie.” Jeremy’s voice softened and she stopped.
Although tears threatened, she faced him, straightening her spine. “I am not some country bumpkin here for your enjoyment, Mr. Wyatt. If I learned nothing else from my season in London, I learned I am not considered acceptable to the Ton. My body is too plump for modern tastes, my hair has a mind of its own, and my feet refuse to shuffle in time to the music. I’ll not have you make a laughingstock of me.”
“Sophie,” he whispered again and dropped the pile of greenery he’d been carrying. He took a step closer and wrapped his hands around her elbows. “You are not too plump, you’re just right.” He placed one hand on her waist and wrapped a tendril of hair around the other hand. “Your hair is the deepest black I’ve ever seen and was the first of your features that drew me in. And, as for dancing, no one starts out dancing well. I’d wager all you need are a few lessons. As for your charity work, I find it a much more appealing topic than the latest dress or bonnet fashion. I’m not making fun of you. You’re very special.” She blinked and stared up at him.
He leaned closer and their bodies bumped together. She stood, transfixed, the heat from his touch branding her skin. “Very special, indeed. I can’t seem to control myself around you, but I will endeavor to do so.” He backed off, picked up the bundle again, extended his arm, and smiled at her. “Shall we continue?”
Her stomach fluttered, and she placed a hand to her waist. She placed her other hand on his arm and swayed into his body, their shoulders touching. They were scandalously close to one another, but she didn’t step back. She appreciated his hard body against hers. Mother would truly be beside herself if she witnessed Sophie’s behavior, but they had a few hundred yards yet to go before they reached the cottage. A few hundred yards where they could be alone. She closed her eyes to better capture the memory and let him lead her home.


14 comments:

  1. Good for you. Took that walk myself about a year ago for very similar reasons.This story sounds lovely, and novella's are perfect for holidays when time is limited. Wishing you well.

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    1. Thanks, Amity, for visiting today and for wishing me luck with my endeavor. I agree, at the holidays, time is precious, and a novella can be easily read in an afternoon.

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  2. Good for you for tackling that self-publish monster. I guess you can now be considered a hybrid. Good luck and great sales for A Regency Yuletide.

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    1. Thanks, Sandra. Part of the reason I did it was to be able to call myself a hybrid.

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  3. Congratulations on stepping into indie waters. I think your decision making makes perfect sense. Wishing best of sales.

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    1. Appreciate the support, Charlotte. BTW, love your name.

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  4. I'm considering an indie venture myself so I'm glad to read your journey wasn't too painful. Best of luck!

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    1. I purposely chose the easiest option available, just to get my feet wet. I may try a full-blown effort a bit later. Good luck to you.

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  5. Congratulations Becky. I hope it all works out for you. I am hovering in the self publishing route myself. Well done.

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    1. Thanks, Tracey. I hovered for a long time before I stuck my toe in.

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    2. I think I have a bit more hovering, yet. Keep us informed, how you go on. Good luck. x

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    1. Thanks, Lauren. It's something I've been toying with for quite some time, and the stars aligned for this one.

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  7. Congrats Becky! Best of luck with sales :)

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